What our Grantees Say

26.01.2016

The results and impacts of species conservation projects are wide ranging and numerous, many of which are presented in the SOS 5 Year Report. As part of the SOS development process we listen to our grantees and their feedback so we can continue to improve SOS for all stakeholders. Below is a selection of what some of our grantees say about the value and benefit of small and medium sized species conservation funding to their target species, their work, their communities and their careers.

 

SPECIES PROJECTS BANGLADESH
Working across a variety of species, threats and conservation approaches, grantees working to protect turtles, dolphins and tigers speak about their projects and the impact of SOS funding in this short film.
Learn more about projects in this video by exploring the SOS interactive map here.

 

EMERGENCY FUNDING TO HELP SIAMESE ROSEWOOD IN THAILAND
To date SOS has funded seventeen Rapid Action Grants addressing emergency issues such as the need for improved anti-poaching efforts in Thap Lan National Park, Thailand. SOS Grantee Eric Ash from FREELAND Foundation explains what is being done to stop the bleeding.
Learn more about the Siamese Rosewood emergency project here.

           

 

MONICA BARRIENTOS, SIERRA CARAL PROJECT MANAGER, FUNDAECO

The project has been really successful in increasing the protection of the incredible endemic species of amphibians in this site. We had more sightings of Duellmanohyla, which for us, is a consequence of a job well done in preserving the forest. Our work with environmental education especially with women and children has resulted in a more informed community that is now empowered and helping us in conserving what has become an official Protected Area thanks to our sustained conservation efforts in Sierra Caral.

Learn more about the Amphibians of Sierra Caral, Guatemala project here.

 

 

MARCIA FARGNOLI, CEO SAVE THE RHINO IN NAMIBIA

“Without Save Our Species Fund’s US $100,000 grant to Save the Rhino Trust’s Field Patrolling and Monitoring Programme in 2012, we would not have had sufficient funding to cover our three most critical expenses: personnel, fuel and vehicle maintenance costs. Thanks to SOS, we were able to continue our valuable work protecting the unique, truly wild, desert-adapted black rhino population (Diceros bicornis bicornis). Only one poaching incident occurred during the grant period. Our heartfelt thanks to SOS!”

Learn more about the Namibian Black Rhino project here.

 

 

GUY STEVENS, FOUNDER OF THE MANTA TRUST

"Support from SOS Funding helped us achieve a milestone for manta and mobula conservation, as results from our funded work, particularly in the South and Southeast Asian nations, contributed towards the reef manta ray and all mobula species gaining international level protection under the Convention for Migratory Species (CMS) Appendix II in November 2014. This is the first international protective law for mobula rays."
Learn more about this Manta Ray project here.

 

 

 

 

 

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