WHAT IF YOU COULD SAVE SPECIES?

This short film gives an overview of what SOS does and the multiple benefits to communities and habitats of a species approach to nature conservation:

 

 

Turning Conservation Knowledge into Action with Impact

SOS - Save Our Species channels funds from donors to existing frontline conservation actors working to protect from extinction some of the world's most threatened species of plants and animals.

 

In parallel SOS comunicates about the successes, sharing stories and learnings with key stakeholders and the general public.

 

SOS does this because saving species is a universal cause. Nature is made up of species and nature is our life support system. Thus SOS communications aim to educate and inspire support for this cause.

 

In so doing, SOS represents one key step in the journey toward saving a species. That process begins with knowledge generated by scientists worldwide and registered in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™. It culminates in SOS identifying and selecting projects while overseeing their implementation to ensure conservation goals are achieved.

 

In between those steps, SOS harnesses the power of the largest network of species experts in the world - the IUCN Species Survival Commission to evaluate project applications on a voluntary basis. It also works closely with its partners to develop the initiative according to strategic priorities.

 

This makes for effective unbiased quality control and allows SOS to optimise conservation return on investment.

 

 

 

PROJECT NEWS
  • Addax
    Saharan Addax antelope faces imminent extinction
    Regional insecurity and oil industry activities in the Sahara desert have pushed the Addax – a migratory species of desert-adapted antelope - to the very knife-edge of extinction according to a recent...
  • 16B-018-001. Freddy Almeida Fieldwork, credit Pol Pintanel, SOS Save Our Species
    In the shadow of the volcano: race against time for the Quito rocket frog
    An imminent eruption of the Cotopaxi Volcano in Ecuador would wipe out the last population of the Quito rocket frog. On International Save the Frogs Day, researcher Santiago Ron from Pontificia Univer...
  • 12A-048-006, Large mesh size Gillnet fishing boat at the Bengal coast by Rubaiyat MansurWCS, SOS Save Our Species,
    Meet the fishers helping save threatened dolphins
    Preventing bycatch of threatened marine megafauna is a challenging task, writes Brian D. Smith from the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh. Fishers are often unable to detect Irrawaddy dolphins entangled ...
  • 13A-063-030, Athony and George excavating a nest, photo credit Trokon Saykpa, SOS Save Our Species, STW Liberia
    Poachers Turn Protectors in Bassa Point Community
    “I started poaching turtle eggs when I was ten years old!” declares Anthony Peabody. Since 2012, however, Anthony has been working as a beach monitor and turtle protector thanks to Sea Turtle Watch (S...
  • 13A-049-009, Chimbo Boé landscape in the rainy season, SOS SAve OUr Species, Stichting Chimbo, Boé Region, Guinea-Bissau
    Bush fire management in the Boé
    In a region such as the Boé, Guinea Bissau, effective fire management is critical to maintaining a balance between local wildlife and farming community needs, according to Tedros Medhin, project coord...
Did You Know: SOS has disbursed almost $10 million in grants over 5 years supporting 100 projects implemented by 60 NGOs and hundreds of people in 50 countries protecting 250 threatened species from extinction.
SOS - Save Our Species
>> A global coalition to conserve threatened species and their habitats